Author Topic: Tubliss system  (Read 2497 times)

doniton2

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Re: Tubliss system
« Reply #30 on: August 25, 2015, 03:56:50 pm »
I think the biggest reason they won't recommend it is because they don't want the liability of street use. Can't say I blame them.
2014 KTM 690
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rednipj

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Re: Tubliss system
« Reply #31 on: August 25, 2015, 06:15:30 pm »
Or, will the insurance cover an accident if it's found out you have tubliss versus what is standard? Even if it's not the tires fault..?

RiverRunner

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Re: Tubliss system
« Reply #32 on: August 25, 2015, 07:02:22 pm »
I very much like the concept of the tubliss system with stiff tires like a Dunlop 606 or 908.  I fear the day I have to change the tube in a 606 on a cold, wet day - when that tire is frozen stiff and friggin' fights back......but I want to know what the risks are before I put my wife on this system and her 690.

Does anyone know why the Tubliss folks don't want people using their product with wider inner wheel widths?  Has to be the wider flat section the spokes lace into that is causing their problems.

What do they believe is the danger??  What happens between or in the wheel-tire-tubliss interface that could be dangerous?  I don't know tires enough to even know what I don't know.  Any tire guru's out here?

I'm sorry to ask this same question in several different posts in this thread - but while it seems to work for some guys with moderate miles under their belt - why are these guys at Tubliss turning down cash and not selling the system to us with their blessing?  There has got to be something that scares them from a liability standpoint.

SDMF_Reaps

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Re: Tubliss system
« Reply #33 on: August 25, 2015, 08:30:42 pm »
I thought it was time to hear the story straight from the horses mouth, so I sent a message to Tubliss. 

I suggested they post a response here, but also offered to post it for them.

I'll keep you guys up to date.

RiverRunner

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Re: Tubliss system
« Reply #34 on: August 25, 2015, 09:45:45 pm »
I think the biggest reason they won't recommend it is because they don't want the liability of street use. Can't say I blame them.

What happens when used on the road?  What fails in the system?

Philip Pino

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Re: Tubliss system
« Reply #35 on: August 25, 2015, 10:45:04 pm »
Just speculation, but there may be a DOT certification which has to be done to certify the system for public highway use.
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RiverRunner

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Re: Tubliss system
« Reply #36 on: October 24, 2015, 06:36:01 pm »
So what happens if you do get a flat with this system?

Does the small 100 psi inner tube hold the tire bead solidly on the rim all by itself?  Or, does a guy have to worry about getting the bead re-seated with high pressure air like you do on a tubeless car tire - I've never had a tubliss or tubeless bike tire that I worked on so I just don't understand how it works.  I've plugged a tubeless car tire, but always had high pressure air to reseat the bead.  Is it just a matter of plugging a hole if needed and pumping her back up to a low pressure level and go?


Philip Pino

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Re: Tubliss system
« Reply #37 on: October 25, 2015, 04:28:37 pm »
The inner, hi-pressure tube acts like a 360* rim lock, in addition to the rim lock of the system, holding the tire bead to the rim.  Hi-pressure air to seat the bead may not be necessary as long as the inner, hi-pressure tube is inflated first.  The hi-pressure tube should prevent the bead from coming unseated when running really low tire pressures.

Plugging a hole in the tire still mounted on the rim is the pretty much the same as plugging a hole in a car tire still mounted on the rim.  The only difference is when you insert the plug into the tire, you should insert it at angle to avoid puncturing the inner tube.  As long as the hi-pressure tube is still inflated, the bead should stay seated.
'14, 690 Enduro R